• Remedy – a term which refers to a homeopathic medicine.
  • Constitutional treatment – this implies a “deeper” or more “broad” analysis of the defense mechanism (often considered throughout the life of the person) and not just an analysis of the problem of the moment.
  • Healing – a “deep” improvement in the ability of the organism to return structure and function to normal. “Healing” is a dynamic state, and a process that proceeds over time. Even though healing may be occurring, it may not be possible for the body to return to a completely normal state. In this instance, there can be healing, in which the person feels much better and has much improved function, but not with a complete resolution.
  • Cure – The complete resolution of a problem. It is sometimes possible to have a cure (as in recovery from an infection or a wound) without a deep “healing,” but in a very serious condition there can be no cure without healing.
  • Aggravation – a temporary worsening of symptoms following the administration of a homeopathic remedy. This is usually avoidable with careful choice of the medicine and especially of the “potency” (strength). When it occurs, however, as part of a curative reaction, there will be some sense that there is an underlying improvement (as in better energy or mood), or that the situation is less severe than it has been in the past.
  • Return of Symptoms – generally a very favorable sign in homeopathic treatment. Old unresolved problems “resurface” so that the organism can “solve” a previously unsolved problem.
  • Provings – experiments in which homeopathic medicines are given to healthy people in order to see what symptoms and states are produced in them. The results form the “symptom picture” of a homeopathic medicine, which in turn defines it’s use in clinical practice.
  • Law of Similars – the symptom picture that is brought about in provings is “matched” to the symptoms of the sick person. If the match has sufficient “similarity” it will act to facilitate a healing response by the organism.
  • Vitality – loosely speaking, the “energy” which animates the physical, emotional, and mental aspects of the person. With high vitality, “sensitivity” to external stress is low, and the adaptive responses of the organism are effective at low volume.
  • Suppression – a symptom is generally present as a representative of the “best” response the organism can manage. If we do not “allow” the symptom to be present (as in the use of Prednisone and other adrenal corticosteroids) the organism may have to produce another symptom, “deeper” than the first. The classic example is the advent of asthma following the suppression of eczema with cortisone ointments. It is possible to suppress with homeopathic medicines as well.
  • Hering’s Law – refers to the principle that in a curative reaction, the most recent symptoms get better first, and the oldest symptoms last. As a secondary phenomenon, the “deepest” symptoms will generally improve first (energy, mood, intellectual state), and more superficial symptoms (skin rashes) last.